App version: 0.1.0

Installment Loan vs. Revolving Credit: Know the Difference

Editor’s note: At Lantern, we strive to help you make financial decisions with confidence. To do this, we occasionally feature content that includes information about our partners and their products or services. We do not provide, endorse, or guarantee any third-party product, service, information or recommendations—and our opinions are our own.
Susan Guillory

Susan Guillory

Updated February 16, 2021
Share this article:
business bank account
When it comes to finding financing to grow your small business, you have several choices. Two of those options are installment loans and revolving credit. Installment loans give you a lump sum, which you pay back (with interest) in monthly payments, while revolving credit gives you a source of funds you can draw on as you need. Each has its own features to consider as you research your business financing options.Below, you’ll find the basics about installment loans, revolving credit, and the differences between the two so you can make an informed choice about which financing makes sense for your business.

What is an Installment Loan?

A business installment loan provides a fixed amount of capital that a small business can use to cover business costs. The business then pays back the loan in monthly installments that include both principal and interest for the duration of the loan term. For example, if your company takes out a $20,000 loan at a 7.5% interest rate over five years, your monthly payment will be $400.76.Within the category of business installment loans, there are both long-term business loans and short-term. Both are offered by banks, credit unions, and online lenders. Qualifications for installment loans will vary depending on the lender. Bank or SBA loans tend to have higher requirements in terms of time in business and credit scores, while online lenders may look at your sales and revenues to determine your eligibility. Even if you own a startup but have bad credit, there may be loan options for your business.

Features of Installment Loans

Also known as installment debt, installment loans get you the access to working capital you need, whether it’s to expand your business or to get through a slow period. The downside to these loans is that they involve an ongoing commitment to regular payments that you’ll have to make for the duration of your loan term. Here are some other considerations.

You’ll Make Monthly Payments

When you sign your loan agreement, you’re agreeing to the amount (which includes both principal and interest) you’ll be required to pay on the loan each month. If you choose a fixed interest rate, the amount you pay will be the same each month. This can make it easier for you to budget that loan payment among your other monthly business costs.If you opt for a variable interest rate, there may be some small variations in your monthly payments. Some months you may pay more in interest than others. The con here is that the changes may make it a little more difficult to budget, but the variations in the payments should stay within a small range. 

You’ll Get a Lump Sum

Many times, you know you need a certain amount of money to renovate a building or purchase costly equipment. An installment loan, unlike revolving credit, gives you access to the amount you are eligible to borrow in a lump sum, all at once. Having that working capital may allow you to take advantage of business opportunities you wouldn’t otherwise have been able to afford.

You May Get a Tax Deduction

If you’re concerned that taking out a loan would mean you have to pay more in taxes, don’t be. The money you receive as a loan doesn’t count as part of your revenue. And a potential plus is that the interest you pay on the loan may be tax-deductible.

What is Revolving Credit?

Revolving credit provides working capital or credit to cover small business costs. It can include lines of credit, trade lines from vendors, and/or business credit cards. With each one, you’re approved to use up to a set amount of credit, but you aren’t required to take it all out at once. You pay back what you’ve used, and interest is only charged on what you haven’t paid back. For example, let’s say you get a line of credit of $20,000 for your small business. In the first month, you take out $10,000 but pay back $5,000 that same month. That means that you’ll pay payments and interest on the $5,000 you still owe, and you’ll still be able to draw on the remaining $15,000. 

Features of Revolving Credit

Like installment loans, revolving credit has both advantages and disadvantages. It’s important to be aware of both when you’re choosing a way to purchase what you need for your business.

You Can Access Funds When and If You Need Them

Sometimes you can’t anticipate how much cash you’ll need to cover business expenses down the road. If that’s the case for your business, it can be helpful to have access to a line of credit instead of receiving a lump sum that you immediately have to start paying back.

Funds Are Always Available (Up to Your Maximum)

With an installment loan, the account is closed once you’ve paid off your balance in full. But with revolving credit, you can take out additional funds once you’ve paid down your balance. There’s no need to reapply for more funds after you’re initially approved.

You May Have an Option to Earn Rewards

Credit cards, which are one type of revolving credit, often offer rewards and perks that may help offset what you pay in interest. If you earn points for your transactions, you may be able to redeem those points for cash back or travel rewards. And while high interest rates are a potential negative for credit cards, if you pay your balance in full each month, you won’t be hit by high interest charges.

Revolving Credit vs. Installment Loans

While both of these types of loans for businesses offer companies access to the funds they need, there are a few key differences to be aware of.

Installment Loan vs. Revolving Credit; Which is Right For You?

There are key points to consider as you determine which of these two options is best for your small business, Figure out how much money you need for the specific purpose you’re borrowing for. You may be able to get more with an installment loan than you can from revolving credit. Consider, too, whether you need all the money at once, or will your expenses be spread over time?Next, determine how long a loan term you want. Keep in mind that business loans with a short term will require higher monthly payments, which will eat into your budget. Long-term loans give you more time to pay back, which will free up your cash flow for other expenses.Consider whether you need cash or credit. If you’re purchasing a fleet of vehicles for your business, you’ll want a loan or line of credit, but if you’re just looking for a resource to help you purchase supplies from a vendor, you might just need a tradeline or business credit card.An installment loan might be good for your business if: 
  • You need a lump sum upfront, to get a good deal on a major purchase, for instance.
  • Your small business has a relatively steady income so you can budget for regular payments.
  • Your small business is well-established and you and/or it have good credit, meaning you may be more likely to get good loan terms.
Revolving credit might be good for your business if: 
  • You want to be prepared for future financial needs but don’t require a lump sum right away.
  • You may need access to relatively small amounts quickly to take advantage of business opportunities or pay for shortfalls.
  • Your business has a need for perks offered by a business credit cards. If you have to travel frequently for your company, for instance, a card that offers miles could help defray those costs

Installment Loan and Revolving Credit Options

 Once you’ve researched the numbers and determined how much money you want to borrow, either through an installment loan or a revolving credit line, it’s time to start shopping solutions. Here are a few options to consider:Each option and lender will have different criteria, so do your due diligence when researching which options you will qualify for at the best rate. SBA loans are often appealing to small businesses, but be sure to understand SBA loans and their requirements before applying.

Financing You Need, When You Need It

Whichever solution you decide on, be it installment loan or revolving credit, use the funds wisely. Taking out financing to invest in larger retail space, hire employees, or buy larger orders of inventory can quickly help your business grow and realize more profits. But spending the money on nonessentials will only put you in deeper debt.And remember that paying your monthly loan, credit card, or line of credit balance on time may help you build your business credit. Keep an eye on your credit report to ensure that those payments are being reported and that there are no discrepancies on your business credit report.Find out which lending options your business is eligible for today!
This article provides general background information only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice or as a substitute for legal counsel. You should consult your own attorney and/or tax advisor if you have a question requiring legal or tax advice. This Lantern website is owned by SoFi Lending Corp., a lender licensed by the Department of Financial Protection and Innovation under the California Financing Law, license number 6054612. SoFi Lending's NMLS number is 1121636. NMLS Consumer Access. SoFi Lending Corp. operates this Lantern website in cooperation with Even Financial Corp. ("Even"). If you submit a loan inquiry, SoFi will deliver your information to Even, and Even will deliver to its network of lenders/partners to review to determine if you are eligible for pre-qualified or pre-approved offers. The lenders/partners receiving your information will also obtain your credit information from a credit reporting agency. If you meet one or more lenders' and/or partners' conditions for eligibility, pre-qualified and pre-approved offers from one or more lenders/partners will be presented to you here on the Lantern website. More information about Even, the process, and its lenders/partners is described on the loan inquiry form you will reach by visiting our Personal Loans page.SOLC21003

About the Author

Susan Guillory

Susan Guillory

Susan Guillory is the President of Egg Marketing, a content marketing firm based in San Diego. She’s written several business books, and has been published on sites including Forbes, AllBusiness, and Cision. She enjoys writing about business and personal credit, financial strategies, loans, and credit cards. Follow her on Twitter @eggmarketing.
Share this article: